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STEM Pre-Academy

Welcome to the STEM Pre-Academy!

The STEM Pre-Academy fosters inspiration and relevance in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics primarily through initiatives, such as teacher workshops, technical focus sessions, and collaborative interaction between middle school teachers and subject matter experts. This teacher-driven multidisciplinary program helps middle school public educators develop and implement research and technology based student curriculum including lessons, activities and projects.

The STEM Pre-Academy is a state-funded program, focused on public middle school teachers in Hawaii.


Latest News

Feature Project: iPad Enabled Digital Publishing @ Moanalua Middle School

At Moanalua Middle School, Language Arts teacher Kathy Nagaji and her team piloted a project with students entitled, “iPad Enabled Digital Publishing”. They drew inspiration from the October 2013 iPad workshop co-presented by STEM Pre-Academy, Hawaii Creative Media, and students from Searider Productions, Wai`anae High School. Kathy and her team successfully sparked students to write in various genres by providing them an opportunity to create relevant, high level products and share them with a wider audience of their peers. The curriculum developed and implemented boosted student engagement and motivation to all-time heights.


Follow-up Mini Workshop: Water Quality Field Trip to Kualoa Ranch

On Saturday, July 26, 2014, teachers from Waipahu Intermediate, Aliamanu Intermediate, Moanalua Middle and Ewa Makai Middle schools met at Kualoa Ranch Educational Center to participate in the STEM Pre-Academy Water Quality Follow-Up Mini Workshop.

Edwin Colon gave an "Introduction to Water Quality" presentation to go over the technical aspects of the water quality parameters teachers tested that day. Dr. Marek Kirs, a researcher at the University of Hawaii Water Resources Research Center, shared his research data and insight on water quality in the streams and beaches in Hawaii.

After the presentations, teachers headed out to the stream to to see how a field trip like this could benefit their students, and how they might incorporate it this upcoming school year.

The Leaves

Recent Comments:

edwinjcolon: Aloha Paige, The way I did my approximation was interpolating between the data... Read More...
pyerxa: Mahalo Edwin - this really helps! Actually, what did you use to calculate this... Read More...
edwinjcolon: Aloha @pyerxa : Launching a quail egg is a cool idea. I would not recommend... Read More...
pyerxa: @edwinjcolon ALoha Edwin - I am setting up my design challenge now: In... Read More...
edwinjcolon: Aloha @pyerxa! Wow, if I understood what you said, sounds like you are mixing a... Read More...
sbrown's picture
sbrown

NPR has started a year-long series on 50 Great Teachers. Worth a listen!

50 Great Teachers: Socrates, The Ancient World's Teaching Superstar  : NPR Ed : NPR
lhashimoto's picture
lhashimoto

Prepping for the Big Island Water Quality Mini Workshop next month. Excited to see the difference in the data collected today compared to the data we'll collect during the workshop! @edwinjcolon. Mahalo @rtamiya and Hilo Intermediate for hosting!

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Photo Credit: Lori Hashimoto
sbrown's picture
sbrown

There's a pretty amazing confluence of technology going on here. It even shows its work! Math teachers take note!

lhashimoto's picture
lhashimoto

Mahalo to Josh Bostic for giving a wonderful presentation at Jarrett Middle School for the PE/Health Pilot Activity! Josh gave a great talk on the effects of added sugars on your body, the science behind the research he does, and choices the students can make to be healthier. Next week: STEM Pre-Academy engineers will work with students to design and create their own self-watering planters to grow their own veggies!

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Photo Credit: Lori Hashimoto 10_21_2014
pyerxa's picture
pyerxa

@edwinjcolon

Oct 20 2014 - 10:50am
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pyerxa's picture
pyerxa

@edwinjcolon

ALoha Edwin - I am setting up my design challenge now:

In partnership with Manalulu Farms, Mars Fut-R-Flight program has created a design challenge for all of you rocket enthusiasts. We are calling it the Payload Orbiter Challenge. The challenge is to create a rocket that will launch a quail egg (payload) to a geostationary orbit (___feet) and land the quail egg safely back to Earth.


The constraint will be the minimum and maximum height. The closest launch to the maximum height will score more points. I will also be making a list of the prices that go with each part so the students have to take cost into consideration. Here is where I could use some help from an engineer.


I have estimated that the rockets will weigh between 50g and 100g with the egg, altimeter, and engines. The students will get to choose their engines. I need to find out what the minimum and maximum height should be set to. Our rockets weighted between 50 - 85g and went between 50 - 174feet using an Estes A8-3 engine. The students will be able to choose their own engines. I need to find out:

1. What the minimum and maximum altitude should be set at?

2. It looks like if the students stick to 18mm engines, they can changes sizes when they IMPROVE their prototype. It looks like A through C is 18mm. Should I limit any of these motors?


Mahalo for your help!

@edwinjcolon

Oct 20 2014 - 10:50am
edwinjcolon's picture
edwinjcolon

Aloha @pyerxa :

Launching a quail egg is a cool idea. I would not recommend launching rockets higher than 250 - 300 ft. I know you like to go BIG! but remember to stay safe. If the student use heavy rockets (meaning 90-120 g total) you can use engines from the A8-3 to the C6-5 (and even with this restrictions, C engines might be too powerful). I would not recommend anything higher that those engines. I did a quick research and found out the weight of this eggs is an average of 13 grams (not bad). Adding the egg alone might not be enough weigh to keep the rockets from going too high. It might be a good idea to restrict the use of engines based on weight of the rocket. Let me know if this answer your questions or if you need more help.


I found this rocket looking for information to answer your questions. There is something really interesting about the configuration of this specific rocket... (hint: the egg goes in the nose)
http://www.apogeerockets.com/Rocket_Kits/Skill_Level_2_Kits/Educational_...


Mahalo!

Oct 20 2014 - 4:59pm
pyerxa's picture
pyerxa

Mahalo Edwin - this really helps! Actually, what did you use to calculate this? I have a pdf about engines and another one on the max height an engine will go, and another one on all the engines and how much wt. they will hold. I also have data on the last class. The weights of the rockets and how high they went.

How would you go about helping the students decide what motor to choose? The only thing I can think of is to go over all these things I listed above. Then have them make the rocket and test it with the A8-3 motor first, then estimate from there. They will probably have to figure it out by investigation and testing unless you have something they can use to calculate it. Rocksim is still trying to fix their program so it fits my operating system (Mavericks).


Mahalo for your help! I think I will choose a height of 200-300 feet. Their rockets will probably be heavy because they need something to support the egg.


Mahalo Nui for your help!

Oct 22 2014 - 12:16pm
edwinjcolon's picture
edwinjcolon

Aloha Paige,

The way I did my approximation was interpolating between the data from the Apogee rockets website. At the bottom of every rocket description page they offer suggestions for what engine to use. In this section they specify max altitude. I used those numbers with the weight of the rockets to interpolate the weights. It can be done for the weight of the rocket or the altitude. If you like, we can meet and I can show you in detail how I calculated it and an easy way for your students to use your tables to select the appropriate engine for their rockets.


Mahalo,

Oct 22 2014 - 2:51pm

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